Premonitions Following an Evil Deed (David Lynch, 1995)

With the Criterion Collection’s tease of Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me (David Lynch, 1992) and the screening of the first two parts of Lynch’s new Twin Peaks 18-part feature at the Cannes Film Festival, it seems like much of the CC world is abuzz over David Lynch and the prospects of new spine numbered editions being announced. This has got me thinking about my favourite shorts by Lynch and so today MMC! casts its spotlight on Premonitions Following an Evil Deed (David Lynch, 1995), a 52-second film made for the Lumière and Company anthology film (1995) celebrating the centenary of Auguste and Louis Lumière’s first films. Contributing shorts to the anthology used the original Cinématographe camera, were edited in-camera, could not be longer than 52 seconds, could not have synchronized sound, and were allowed no more than three takes. This eerie and foreboding short was filmed on five sets constructed at the house of Gary D’Amico, Lynch’s special effects co-ordinator. Premonitions is one of six restored short films included on Criterion’s edition of Eraserhead (David Lynch, 1977).

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Devilman: The Birth (Umanosuke Iida, 1987) and Devilman: Demon Bird Sirene (Umanosuke Iida, 1990)

TO FIGHT A DEMON, ONE MUST BECOME A DEMON!

Prehistoric demons, hideous and pitiless monsters that consume humans body and soul, secretly threaten mankind. Humanity’s only hope is to harness the demons’ power and turn it against them. With the help of his friend Ryo Asuka, the pure-hearted Akira Fudo merges with the demon Amon, God of War and Beast of Hell, to become Devilman, powerful defender of the human race with the strength and abilities of a demon! In Devilman: The Birth and Devilman: Demon Bird Sirène, this hellish anti-hero pits his infernal might against possessed party-goers, squid and spiders monsters, a sadistic turtle creature, and a beautiful and savage winged demoness.

Adapted from the 1972-1973 manga of visionary author and artist Go Nagai, Umanosuke Iida’s pair of original video animations faithfully represents the gory violence and incredible monstrosities that defined the series and made Devilman an iconic figure in Japanese popular culture. Arrow Video proudly presents these classic works of 1980s anime excess on high-definition Blu-ray with both their original Japanese audio and notorious English dub tracks.

Special Features:

  • New High Definition digital transfer
  • High Definition Blu-ray (1080p) presentation
  • Original stereo audio for original Japanese and English dub tracks (uncompressed on the Blu-ray Disc)
  • Isolated music tracks featuring the compositions of Kenji Kawai
  • New optional English subtitle translation
  • New interview with acclaimed author and artist Go Nagai
  • “We All Steal from Go Nagai!” – Directors Guillermo del Toro, Rob Zombie, and Yoshihiro Nishimura on the legacy of Go Nagai and Devilman
  • Reversible sleeve featuring newly commissioned artwork
  • Illustrated collector’s booklet featuring new writing by Natsume Fusanosuke and Andrea Marinelli and an essay by creator Go Nagai written on the 30th anniversary of Devilman
  • Devilman: Tanjo Hen – the single volume novel that originally accompanied the OVA in 1987, newly translated and reprinted in its entirety
  • The Demon Bible – the original book published by Bandai in 1990 featuring artwork by Go Nagai, includes original Japanese and new English translations and reprinted in its entirety

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Spookies (Genie Joseph, Thomas Doran, and Brendan Faulkner, 1986)

FROM BEYOND OBLIVION, THE SPOOKIES ARE HERE AGAIN!

AV_Inferno_DVD_.inddAn old, abandoned, isolated mansion seems like the perfect place for a group of young couples to party and let loose, but it may be perfect trap to lose their souls. Inside, a strange Ouija board leads the group into a supernatural web of terror, all plotted by an ancient sorcerer gathering sacrifices to restore his unwilling bride once again to life. Just a few more humans are needed to complete his spell …

A dizzying array of monstrous creatures are conjured by the wizard – hellish lizards, skeletal reapers, demons, zombies, seductive spider women, entrancing ghosts, and flatulent muck men, all empowered with a singular instinct to kill – and one by one, each guest is victim to this twisted, supernatural onslaught. Nothing can prepare you for the incredible special effects of Spookies, a horror cult classic that must be seen to be believed!

Special Features:

  • New high definition digital transfer
  • High-Definition Blu-ray (1080p) and Standard DVD Presentation
  • Uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Optional English SDH subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing
  • Introduction by the filmmakers
  • Audio commentary with film historian Max Evry
  • Interviews with actor Anthony Valbrio, visual effects artist Al Magliochetti, and co-producer Frank Farel
  • Original ending taken from the interpositive held by the production’s original visual effects artist
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Illustrated collector’s booklet featuring new writing by regional horror historian Brian Albright

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I Love Sarah Jane (Spencer Susser, 2008)

One last Halloween-ready short before we’re overrun by ghouls and goblins! Spencer Susser’s I Love Sarah Jane (2008) takes the zombie apocalypse to the Australian suburbs and mixes in a healthy dose of puppy love and some Lord of the Flies-type childhood nastiness to boot. I Love Sarah Jane reminds that zombies are bad but kids are the worst.

Happy Halloween!

Ghost Stories (Late Night Work Club, 2013)

Next up, we offer a short film of short films – the indie-animated anthology Ghost Stories (2013). Containing 11 minimalist shorts, Ghost Stories is the product of various members of the Late Nite Work Club crafting these pieces between projects and classes. MMC! is particularly fond of Charles Huettner’s The Jump, Caleb Wood’s Rat Trap, and Alex Grigg’s Phantom Limb, although Ghost Stories is an impressively satisfying effort throughout. In fact, the omnibus format of Ghost Stories produces a convivial effect, expanding the regard for these shorts by placing them alongside one another and creating a whole greater than its parts.

We Together (Henry Kaplan, 2016)

The best dancing zombie video since John Landis’ Thriller (1983), Henry Kaplan’s We Together (2016) offers some interesting ideas as to why the undead might partake of some extended krumping. Featuring the music of Kerron Hurd, this short manages to do something surprising and intelligent with an over-played and often uninspired monster.  For more on the making of We Together, check out Henry Kaplan’s interview at Directors Notes.