Josie and the Pussycats (Deborah Kaplan and Harry Elfont, 2001)

Designed for the film lover in mind, SHOUT SELECT shines a light on films that deserve a spot on your shelf. From acknowledged classics to cult favorites to unheralded gems, SHOUT SELECT celebrates the best in filmmaking, giving these movies the love and attention they deserve.

LONG TAILS AND EARS FOR HATS!

Re-discover the Pussycats, Josie (Rachael Leigh Cook), Melody (Tara Reid), and Val (Rosario Dawson), three small-town musicians with big dreams but little future! The chance of a lifetime arrives out of the blue when Wyatt (Alan Cumming) of MegaRecords signs them to an awesome recording contract without even hearing them play. Suddenly, Josie and the Pussycats are living life in the fast lane with sold-out concerts, chartered jets, a number one single, and global stardom. Their good fortune comes at price however and the Pussycats soon discover that they’re being used by their record label’s maniacal CEO Fiona (Parker Posey) to control the youth of America. Featuring a hit soundtrack of pop-punk songs and purr-fectly hilarious performances, Josie and the Pussycats is a modern cult classic about friendship, rock music, and capitalist conspiracies.

Special Features:

  • NEW HD Film Transfer
  • NEW “Back To Riverdale” With Directors Deborah Kaplan and Harry Elfont and Stars Rachael Lee Cook, Rosario Dawson, and Tara Reid
  • NEW “Here and Meow” With Singer Kay Hanley
  • NEW “In Through The Backdoor” With Actors Seth Green, Donald Faison, and Breckin Meyer
  • Audio Commentary With Directors Deborah Kaplan and Harry Elfont and Producer Marc Platt
  • Backstage Pass
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Josie and the Pussycats “3 Small Words” Music Video
  • Dujour “Backdoor Lover” and “Dujour Around The World” Music Videos
  • Theatrical Trailer
  • Production Notes

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SFFF Day 3 – Hard Knock Lives

‘Stead of treated, the kids were getting tricked on Day 3 of the Saskatoon Fantastic Film Festival. Certainly the SFFF’s most celebrated film was Issa López’s festival darling Tigers Are Not Afraid (2017). MMC! has discussed López’s film on more than one of occasion, and so we’ll take its greatness as read and briefly discuss Jérémy Comte’s Fauve (2018), a Canadian short that feels tailor-made to open for Tigers. A Special Jury Prize-winner at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, Fauve concerns a pair of boys exploring a surface mine who “sink into a seemingly innocent power game with Mother Nature as the sole observer.” The short brings to mind Gus Van Sant’s Gerry (2002) and a very specific John Mulaney joke about an impression he had as a child, but these glib comparisons belie the truly heartbreaking nature of Comte’s film. Fans of Tigers would be well served to seek out Fauve.

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5 Great Reasons to Attend the Buried Alive Film Festival – The November 16th Edition!

Sure, MMC! made the Buried Alive Film Festival’s first day of full programming sound great, but BAFF really comes into its own on Friday, November 16th. There, BAFF offers three feature-length movies, one live score, one supporting short, and a full program of 10 short films entitled “Bury Me With My Favorite Films.” There’s plenty to see and enjoy at the 7 Stages Theatre this Friday. Those on the fence about attending or those looking for a preview of what to watch thankfully have MMC! to point the way.

Here, dear reader, are MMC!‘s five favourite reasons to BAFF this Friday!

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SFFF Day 1 Report – Four Killers and a Dog

Even before I arrived in Saskatoon, I felt like Fantastic Film Festival-action was meeting me like a herald of things to come. It had something to do with the man waiting at my flight’s gate conspicuously wearing a black eyepatch that threatened spy movie villainy. It also had something to do with the man behind me in security and his laptop that tested positive for “explosive residue.” Fortunately for me, action-thrillers weren’t slated until Day 2 of the Saskatoon Fantastic Film Festival and my flight proceeded without complication, bringing me to Day 1 of SFFF and a block of films featuring some disturbed title characters.

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The Cat With Hands (Robert Morgan, 2001)

Robert Morgan’s The Cat With Hands (2001) has become something of a horror short classic over the last 15 years, utilizing stop-motion animation’s unsettling, uncanny look to ghastly perfection. The short was inspired by a recurring childhood nightmare of the director’s sister and passed that distress on to its viewers now.  Enjoy!

The Cat Came Back (Cordell Barker, 1983)

NFBI suspect that the NFB may be most widely known internationally for Cordell Barker’s The Cat Came Back (1983), probably in no small part to the unwavering advocacy of film critic Leonard Maltin.  The Winnipeg-based animator adapts an 1893 comic song of Henry S. Miller that had been popularized as a children’s song by Winnipeg-based performer Fred Penner – Penner recorded his 1979 version on an album of the same title.  Barker’s film inverts the predator-prey dynamic of classic animation pairings like Tom and Jerry or the Roadrunner and Wile E. Coyote, and its strongly rhythmic quality and its excessively modulated soundtrack makes for a memorably uproarious animated short film.

As per the NFB:

This hilarious Oscar®-nominated animation is based on the century-old folk song of the same name.  Old Mr. Johnson makes increasingly manic attempts to rid himself of a little yellow cat that just won’t stay away…  Also won the Genie Award for best animated short film.