Trailer Tuesday

The Criterion Collection’s announcements for January 2018 sees the return of G. W. Pabst to the Collection, the long-expected arrival of John Hughes with a less-expected title, a Ken Loach Palme d’Or winner,  and the return of the Eclipse series! From a trailer perspective, it is the release of Janus Films’ Night of the Living Dead 4K restoration trailer that has likely made the greatest waves. George Romero’s classic 1968 film has probably never looked better, even when it was first released.

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Trailer Tuesday

With December announcements being decidedly reserved on all fronts, this latest “Trailer Tuesday” at MMC! requires a different tack and so we start with a future Criterion title a few years still to come – Wes Anderson’s Isle of Dogs (2018). For all of Anderson’s intricate, youthful peccadilloes, he’s never really stooped to fanboy fascination with Japan and I suppose that should have surprised. Isle of Dogs has the director jump into the deep end of Japan’s pop cultural swimming pool with this dystopic, retro, sci-fi story of a boy and his dog(s) (and as one of those fanboys myself, I couldn’t be happier). My next Arrow Video proposal has had me thinking about dogs a lot and so this announcement hits a particular chord. I love those dog sneezes!

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Trailer Tuesday

November will add three new spine numbers to the Criterion Collection – Desert Hearts (Donna Deitch, 1985), The Philadelphia Story (George Cukor, 1940), and Jabberwocky (Terry Gilliam, 1977) – and in a case of First World/film nerd problems, none of these upcoming versions port over all the special features of the existing editions I own! Ugh, how I must suffer. Thankfully, the trailer for Jabberywocky scores high marks for Pythonesque recklessness and a great series of gag warnings. Brilling!

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Trailer Tuesday – Gimli Film Festival Edition

Once an Icelandic colony, Gimli sits at the edge of Lake Winnipeg, a beach community in the province of Manitoba that is home to a couple of thousand residents and that hosts an ever growing film festival for five days each July. The seventeenth and latest iteration of the Gimli Film Festival was its largest so far, including approximately 45 feature films and various shorts. Needless to say, no attendee can see the entire program. I was lucky enough to attend for three of the five days of programming, making it to 14 screenings and avoiding the dozen plus titles I had already seen.

The hallmarks of the GFF are its free sunset screenings on the beach with its massive 11 metre tall screen set up out in the water. This year featured Twister (Jan de Bont, 1996), Footloose (Herbert Ross, 1984), The Neverending Story (Wolfgang Petersen, 1984), and the Criterion title Fantastic Mr. Fox (Wes Anderson, 2009). Classic car owners came out en masse for the screening of American Graffiti (George Lucas, 1973), lining the beach with some beautifully chromed vehicles, however the most inspired selection was Alfred Hitchcock‘s The Birds (1963) with Gimli and its gulls allowing Bodega Bay to spread out beyond the screen’s limits.

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Trailer Tuesday

What a month! Criterion knocks it outta the park with its October releases, trailers abound with the San Diego Comic Con in full swing, reviews from the ongoing Fantasia Film Festival keep rolling in, and I’m scheduled for 14 screenings at the Gimli Film Festival later this week! Wheeeee!

The stand out title in Criterion’s stacked October announcements is Stanley Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon (1975). It’s taken me quite a while to become comfortable with the contrasting beauty of Kubrick’s compositions and the coldness of his direction, but this tension has always felt right in Barry Lyndon, where the great director dissects the shallowness of his subject with great insight and depth. Everything about the Criterion Collection’s edition of Barry Lyndon looks amazing and I suspect I may need to re-write my Top Ten as a result.

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Trailer Tuesday

First, a shout out to Cole and Ericca at The Magic Lantern Podcast who shared some love for MMC! in their recent discussion of Little Murders. Cole and Ericca provide a great (and very funny) discussion on the relationship at the centre of Arkin’s film. For the record, I’m with Cole – the wedding sequence stands as the most enjoyable part of the movie and Elliott Gould’s unresponsiveness to the demands of social convention or personal interactions is all too recognizable.

My most recent Criterion connection came by seeing Brazilian singer Seu Jorge perform live his selection of David Bowie covers from Wes Anderson’s The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou (2004). Jorge put on an amazing show, providing a variety of entertaining anecdotes on the making of the film, displaying some nimble guitar-work, and filling the theatre with his deep, impressive voice. The trailer for The Life Aquatic prominently features Jorge’s covers, serving as an effective promo of the singer’s currently touring show. Don’t miss it!

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