The Lost One (Peter Lorre, 1951)

The Criterion Collection, a continuing series of important classic and contemporary films presents The Lost One.

criterion logoIn Peter Lorre’s only directorial effort, German scientist Dr. Karl Rothe murders his fiancée for betraying him and disclosing his research to enemy nations.  Instead of being punished, Rothe’s crime is covered up by Nazi authorities, leaving the doctor gripped by a compulsion to kill.  With the end of World War II, Rothe finds work at a refugee camp under an assumed name, but his past catches up with him when a fellow scientist and former Nazi agent arrives looking for sanctuary of his own.  Co-written and starring Lorre as well, The Lost One was rejected by audiences upon its release but has since become a masterpiece of post-WWII German cinema, an intensely haunting and fatalistic film that interrogates the psychological cruelty that enabled the war and the individual and collective guilt that followed.

Disc Features:

  • New 4K digital restoration, undertaken by the German Film Institute, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Audio commentary by Lorre biographer Stephen D. Youngkin
  • Peter Lorre – The Double Face, Harun Farocki’s 1984 documentary
  • Displaced Person: Peter Lorre, Robert Fischer’s 2007 documentary
  • Interview with German film historian Christoph Fuchs
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by Lorre scholar Sarah Thomas, excerpts of Lorre’s own work script, biographical character sketches, documents on the film’s rating, and Bertolt Brecht’s poem to Lorre, “To the Actor P.L. in Exile;” and a new paperback edition of Lorre’s original novel “The Lost One,” unreleased in Germany until 1996 and available in North America here for the first time

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Hedwig and the Angry Inch (John Cameron Mitchell, 2001)

The Criterion Collection, a continuing series of important classic and contemporary films presents Hedwig and the Angry Inch.

criterion logoAdapted from the critically acclaimed off-Broadway hit, John Cameron Mitchell’s Hedwig and the Angry Inch tells the story of an “internationally ignored” rock singer and her search for stardom and love.  Born an East German boy named Hansel, Hedwig marries an American G.I. to get over the Berlin Wall to freedom and suffers a botched sex-change operation in the process that leaves her with just a one-inch mound of flesh.  Finding herself high, dry, and divorced in a Kansas trailer park, Hedwig pushes on to form a rock band and encounters a lover/protegé in Tommy Gnosis, a young Christian army brat who eventually leaves her, stealing her songs to become a huge rock star.  Left to stalk Tommy’s stadium tour with her group, the Angry Inch, Hedwig crisscrosses America intent on exposing Gnosis and claiming her rightful position in the pantheon of rock icons.

Disc Features:

  • New, restored 2K digital transfer, supervised by director John Cameron Mitchell and cinematographer Frank G. DeMarco, with 5.1 surround DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Audio commentary featuring Mitchell and DeMarco
  • Deleted scenes with optional commentary
  • Whether You Like It or Not: The Story of Hedwig, a feature-length documentary on the musical and the film
  • I am Hedwig, new interviews on with Mitchell, Neil Patrick Harris, Andrew Rannells, Michael C. Hall, Darren Criss, and Taye Diggs, the stars of Hedwig‘s Broadway productions
  • Follow My Voice: With the Music of Hedwig, Katherine Linton’s documentary on the lives of four students attending the Harvey Milk School for LGBTQ youth and the recording of Wig in a Box, a tribute album raising funds for the institute operating the school
  • Anatomy of a Scene, a making of featurette on the adaptation of the musical at the Sundance Institute
  • New video appreciation by critic Kim Morgan
  • Theatrical trailer
  • PLUS: An essay by critic Stephanie Zacharek

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Kung Fury (David Sandberg, 2015)

“It’s bloody well brilliant.” – Todd Brown, TWITCH FILM.

“The world will never be the same.” – Peter Debruge, VARIETY.

Drafthouse Films LogoAfter his partner is killed in the line of duty, Miami Police Department detective and martial artist Kung Fury time travels from the 1980s to World War II to kill rival kung fu master, Adolf Hitler (a.k.a. “Kung Führer”), only to be sent back to the Viking Age where he must face powerful warrior women and Norse Gods.  This ’80s inspired, action extravaganza pits Kung Fury against lethal arcade robots, martial arts masters, laser-dinosaurs, and Nazi mutants.  With only his biceps, his skateboard skills, a collection of similarly badass heroes, and a mere 30-minutes to save history, Kung Fury kicks and quips his way to victory.  Constrained by a miniscule budget, David Sandberg’s Kung Fury was shot on green screen to construct a fanciful trailer of epic, B-movie awesomeness that became an internet sensation and inspired a highly successful Kickstarter campaign.  The result is an homage to 1980s adventure films and side-scrolling video game battles, complete with astounding visual effects and a shredding electropop synth score.  A darling of the Directors’ Fortnight at Cannes, Kung Fury now hits hard media with the mighty force of Thor’s enchanted hammer!

Special Features:

Hack Time Edition – Package Includes:

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The American Astronaut (Cory McAbee, 2001)

“Imagine a Laurel & Hardy skit directed by Salvador Dali.” – ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY

“More original than almost anything you’ve seen this millennium.” – SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL

“Now that’s entertainment!” – FILM THREAT

“Surprising and hilarious! May be the most wonderfully strange film experience you have this year.” – ELLE MAGAZINE

Drafthouse Films LogoSpace travel has become a dirty way of life dominated by derelicts, grease monkeys and hard-boiled interplanetary traders such as Samuel Curtis.  Written, directed and starring Cory McAbee of the legendary cult band The Billy Nayer Show, this sci-fi musical-western uses flinty black-and-white photography, Lo-Fi sets and the spirit of the final frontier.  We follow Curtis on his Homeric journey to provide the all-female planet of Venus with a suitable male, while pursued by the enigmatic killer, Professor Hess.  The film features music by The Billy Nayer Show and some of the most original rock ‘n’ roll scenes ever committed to film.

Also included are McAbee’s hour-long, genre-defying space western Stingray Sam, his 52-minute fantasy Crazy & Thief, and his award-winning short films Reno, The Ketchup and Mustard Man, The Man on the Moon, and Billy Nayer, collected together here for the first time and providing a comprehensive review of one of America’s most audacious independent filmmakers.

Special Features:

  • Live audio commentary with writer, director, and star Cory McAbee
  • Gallery of production stills, storyboards, graphic designs, and sidewalk drawings
  • Ceres walk test footage
  • Trailers
  • Stingray Sam, McAbee’s 2009 musical-comedy, sci-fi-western serial recounting Stingray Sam and the Quasar Kid’s mission to save a kidnapped girl, with behind the scenes extra footage
  • Crazy & Thief, McAbee’s 2012 fantasy about a seven year-old girl who takes her two year-old brother on a voyage through a world of homemade mythologies
  • Reno, a 2007 short starring McAbee as a singing cowboy bragging about his travels through Nevada
  • The Ketchup and Mustard Man, a stream of consciousness-narrated musical
  • The Man on the Moon, McAbee’s short film about a dejected husband exiled on the moon, shot on a Fisher Price Pixel Camera
  • Billy Nayer, an animated short film direct by and starring McAbee as a singing bar patron
  • 24-page booklet of photos, production stills and promotional materials, plus a new interview with Cory McAbee

“Hertz Donut” Edition – Package Includes:

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Symbol (Hitoshi Matsumoto, 2009)

“Ultimately creative, laugh out loud funny and leaving you in a slightly bedazzled trance.” – Niels Matthijs, TWITCH

Drafthouse Films LogoA Mexican wrestler called Escargot Man broods over an ominous feeling.  Is it his upcoming match with his younger, stronger opponent Tequila Joe or something deeper?  Meanwhile, a man with mop-top hair and polka-dot pajamas (Hitoshi Matsumoto) awakens in a sealed white room, faced with an array of unusual switches that might provide his means of escape or may just drive him mad with frustration.  Reveling in low-brow comedy and physical humour, the unforeseeable connection between the two worlds is eventually revealed in spectacularly astounding fashion.  Hitoshi Matsumoto plays triple duty as writer, director, and star to this laugh out loud examination of cause and effect, producing “a candy coated, Japanese game show version of a Franz Kafka short story” (Todd Brown, Twitch).  Side-splitting and mind-blowing, Symbol is a film experience that defies description and categorization.

Special Features:

  • Making-of featurette with optional commentary by filmmaker and star Hitoshi Matsumoto
  • Deleted and extended scenes
  • Thearical Trailer
  • 16-page booklet of photos, promotional art, and an essay by Todd Brown

“That Stinks!” Edition – Package Includes:

  • Symbol on Blu-ray or Standard DVD featuring over 2 hours of bonus material
  • High quality 720p HD Digital Download of the Film Available on Street Date
  • 27″ x 40″ Reversible Poster
  • Limited Edition “Escargot Man” Luchador Mask

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The Tenant (Roman Polanski, 1976)

The Criterion Collection, a continuing series of important classic and contemporary films presents The Tenant.

criterion logoAn apartment with an unhappy past, in a building filled with faintly sinister residents, sets the stage for Roman Polanksi’s riveting thriller The Tenant.  Polanski plays Trelkovsky, a quiet, timid file clerk whose unremarkable life becomes increasingly overshadowed with dread and fear after he moves into his new home.  Adding to his paranoia are the building’s other occupants, who do nothing to alleviate his growing obsession with the untimely, tragic fate of the apartment’s previous tenant.  Is Trelkovsky’s dread truly justified – or is it simply the result of his seemingly disintegrating mental state?  A brilliant international cast and Polanski’s own penchant for packaging and delivering unprecedented suspense make The Tenant a haunting, riveting conclusion to his Apartment Trilogy.

Disc Features:

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