The Lost One (Peter Lorre, 1951)

The Criterion Collection, a continuing series of important classic and contemporary films presents The Lost One.

criterion logoIn Peter Lorre’s only directorial effort, German scientist Dr. Karl Rothe murders his fiancée for betraying him and disclosing his research to enemy nations.  Instead of being punished, Rothe’s crime is covered up by Nazi authorities, leaving the doctor gripped by a compulsion to kill.  With the end of World War II, Rothe finds work at a refugee camp under an assumed name, but his past catches up with him when a fellow scientist and former Nazi agent arrives looking for sanctuary of his own.  Co-written and starring Lorre as well, The Lost One was rejected by audiences upon its release but has since become a masterpiece of post-WWII German cinema, an intensely haunting and fatalistic film that interrogates the psychological cruelty that enabled the war and the individual and collective guilt that followed.

Disc Features:

  • New 4K digital restoration, undertaken by the German Film Institute, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray
  • Audio commentary by Lorre biographer Stephen D. Youngkin
  • Peter Lorre – The Double Face, Harun Farocki’s 1984 documentary
  • Displaced Person: Peter Lorre, Robert Fischer’s 2007 documentary
  • Interview with German film historian Christoph Fuchs
  • Theatrical trailer
  • New English subtitle translation
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring a new essay by Lorre scholar Sarah Thomas, excerpts of Lorre’s own work script, biographical character sketches, documents on the film’s rating, and Bertolt Brecht’s poem to Lorre, “To the Actor P.L. in Exile;” and a new paperback edition of Lorre’s original novel “The Lost One,” unreleased in Germany until 1996 and available in North America here for the first time

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The Last Bridge (Helmut Kautner, 1954)

The Criterion Collection, a continuing series of important classic and contemporary films presents The Last Bridge.

criterion logoHelmut Käutner’s stark, realist World War II drama The Last Bridge is an exceptional anti-war statement and a significant treatise on our shared humanity.  Maria Schell portrays Helga, a German doctor working as a nurse in a line hospital in Yugoslavia who is captured by partisan guerrillas and forced to care for their wounded and protect them from a typhus outbreak.  Torn between her national loyalties and her Hippocratic Oath, Helga struggles in the face of the suffering around her, leading to one of cinema’s most profound and tragic conclusions.  Widely acclaimed at its release, winning the International Jury Prize, a Special Prize for Schell’s performance, and the International Catholic Organization for Cinema and Audiovisual’s prize at the 1954 Cannes Film Festival, The Last Bridge is a poignant articulation of war’s folly and compassion’s value.

Disc Features:

  • New digital master, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Audio commentary by German film scholar Eric Rentschler
  • Maria Schell: Smiling Through Tears, a new 45-minute video on actress Maria Schell
  • Schell’s 1959 appearance on What’s My Line?
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • Plus:  A booklet featuring new essays by film scholars Christoph Huber and Philip Kemp

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Great Freedom No. 7 (Helmut Kautner, 1944)

The Criterion Collection, a continuing series of important classic and contemporary films presents Great Freedom No. 7.

criterion logoSet in a dive bar in Hamburg, Helmut Käutner’s first color film focuses on the unhappy life of the “singing seaman” Hannes Kröeger (Hans Albers), an entertainer who performs for an audience of prostitutes and sailors on leave.  Hannes is obliged by his dying brother to care for his former mistress Gisa (Ilse Werner) and soon falls madly in love with the young woman.  Gisa is torn between the singer and a young dockworker who courts her, leaving Hannes to struggle between pursuing her and a new life together, remaining in his cabaret, or finally returning to sea as a true sailor once again.  Titled after the street where the cabaret is located in Hamburg’s red light district, Great Freedom No. 7 is emblematic of Käutner’s humane storytelling and his aesthetic resistance to the film culture of the Third Reich.

Disc Features:

  • New digital master, with uncompressed monaural soundtrack on the Blu-ray edition
  • Audio commentary by German film scholar Eric Rentschler
  • Terra in Agfacolor, a new video essay with German film historian R. Dixon Smith on Terra film studios and the Agfacolor film process
  • Collection of downloadable songs performed by Hans Albers
  • New and improved English subtitle translation
  • PLUS:  A booklet featuring new essays by German film scholar Rembert Hueser and Helmut Käutner historian Robert C. Reimer

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