From Studio D

NFBIn 1974, the International Women’s Year, the NFB established Studio D, a film studio dedicated to female filmmakers that became one of the Board’s most successful units.  Studio D became the victim of budget cuts in 1996, but the NFB’s commitment to feminist films continued, announcing in 2016 a gender-parity initiative dedicating half of the Board’s productions and half of its funding to female filmmakers (a balance the NFB was close to achieving without the formal pledge anyways).  Included here are two of Studio D’s most appreciated works – If You Love This Planet (1982), Terre Nash’s powerful depiction of Dr. Helen Caldicott cut against medical footage of Hiroshima survivors, nuclear test stock footage, and Cold War Hollywood movies (starring Ronald Reagan); and Flamenco at 5:15 (Cynthia Scott, 1983), an observational rumination on youth, tutelage, physicality, and flamenco’s theatrical impact.

As per the NFB:

This Oscar®-winning short film is comprised of a lecture given to students by outspoken nuclear critic Dr. Helen Caldicott, president of Physicians for Social Responsibility in the USA.  Her message is clear: disarmament cannot be postponed.  Archival footage of the bombing of Hiroshima and images of its survivors seven months after the attack heighten the urgency of her message.

As per the NFB:

This Oscar®-winning short film is an impressionistic record of a flamenco dance class given to senior students of the National Ballet School of Canada by two great teachers from Spain, Susana and Antonio Robledo.  The film shows the beautiful young North American dancers—inspired by the flamenco rhythms and mesmerized by Susana’s extraordinary energy—joyously merging with an ancient gypsy culture.

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